Healthy Aging Resources

Live Life to the Full in Optimal Health

  • Jun 29

    About two years ago, a friend of mine who is in her 40’s came to me for advice about arthritis. Her doctor had told her that her neck was like a 65 year olds. Not only did she have arthritis in her neck, but in her feet as well. My friend is passionate about horse riding – how much longer will she be able to do that? How do we prevent and care for Arthritis?

    Both my parents had arthritis – my father’s was in his feet and hands, my mother’s in her back. My husband has arthritis in his knee – a result of a rugby injury and having cartilage removed. Arthritis is both painful and debilitating.

    What causes arthritis?
    There are two types of arthritis – osteoarthritis (the most common, caused by wear and tear) and rheumatoid arthritis (inflammation of the joints due to an autoimmune disease).

    Doctor Ray Strand says “Osteoarthritis is a degenerative process within the joints. Over 70% of the people over 50 years of age have some degree of degenerative arthritis. This is not a disease that will typically shorten one’s life, but will certainly cause significant pain and disability if left untreated.
    “When researchers study joint fluid extracted from an inflamed joint, they note a significant increase in the number of excessive free radicals. In contrast, fluid from a normal joint has no free radicals present. Studies have shown a significant increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis in those individuals who have low levels of Vitamin E, beta-carotene, and selenium. Research has further indicated low levels of vitamin D and Vitamin C in patients suffering severe joint disease and whose disease progresses much more rapidly than the norm”.

    My horse-riding friend is a ‘health nut’ – she eats organic food and has a healthy lifestyle. But that hasn’t been enough to prevent Osteoarthritis. My suggestion is to add advanced-quality broad spectrum supplements to a healthy lifestyle to support healthy joints and bones. And to also continue with exercise to maintain fitness, muscle strength, heart health, relieve pain and stiffness and to get better quality of sleep.

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease – caused by a virus or bacteria. The immune system becomes confused and it attacks itself rather than the bacteria or virus. The joints become inflamed causing chronic inflammation, pain and joint swelling; and the joint fluid which is usually thick becomes thin, so the cartilage becomes less protective.

    Further Reading
    (NaturalNews) A recent study from the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, Minnesota, has found that rheumatoid arthritis is on the increase among Caucasian women. And the culprit is likely an environmental one, like vitamin D deficiency, rather than a genetic one.

    Do Glucosamine Supplements Work? an article by ‘Nutrition Diva’ Monica Reinagel, M.S., L.D./N.

    Very informative article from the Linus Pauling Institute about Vitamin D and the health impact of not having enough of this critical vitamin in your body.

    If you would like to find out which nutritional supplements are recommended for joint health, please request my free eBook, by completing the form on your top right.

    I trust you found this helpful. If you did, please share it with others by clicking on the Facebook and/or Twitter icons below. And be sure to leave your comments and questions below. Thank you!

  • May 28

    Do you have any healthy aging strategies? I am a baby boomer and I am feeling great. However I see other boomers who are starting to crumble. Just recently a friend of mine, who is well under 50, has been diagnosed with pre-cancerous cells and will shortly be undergoing an operation. Her youngest daughter is 6 years old. Who do you know who has suffered from cancer, heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, and stroke? I have had two friends my age die from breast cancer and ovarian cancer in the last two years. What can we do to stay younger longer so that we can live life to the full?

    There are lots of commonsense things that we know about and can do (and should do).

    Here are ten healthy aging strategies:

    1. Enjoy sunshine! We need to spend 15 to 20 minutes in bright sun to allow our bodies to make the hormone Vitamin D. If you live in temperate zones (37 degrees north and south of the equator) consider topping up with a good quality Vitamin D3 product 1000 to 5000 iu daily.

    2. Eat fresh non-processed food. Eat a variety of fruit and veggies every day. Cut out sugar. Eat good quality protein in small amounts. Here is a few smoothie and juice recipes that are easy to make.  Dr Steven Gundry has written a book called ‘Diet Evolution’ which explains why our diets are so very important.

    3. Drink plenty of good water. Some people say they don’t like the taste. I have installed a reverse osmosis water filter and it not only makes the water taste delicious, chemicals and toxins have been removed. On top of flushing toxins out of the body, a major BENEFIT of drinking water is to carry NUTRIENTS into the cells of the body. In addition to helping nutrients get into the cells where they are needed, the benefit of drinking water in adequate amounts also helps to keep the CELLS well …hydrated so they can FUNCTION properly and efficiently. Cut down or stop drinking sugary drinks (and coffee and alcohol too).

    4. Exercise. Find something you enjoy – walking, dancing, cycling, gardening, jogging, pilates, zumba, playing golf…add a comment and tell us what you do for exercise and why you like it.

    5. Rest. Controlling stress is a big factor in our well-being. Find something that gives you peaceful enjoyment that releases you from life’s stresses. It may be meditation, listening to music, curling up with a good library book. What do you do for quiet enjoyment?

    6. Sleep soundlyClick here for more information

    7. Take advanced quality nutritional supplements. Taking once-a-day supplements will not make you healthier. Nor do supplements that are at Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA/RDI) doses. They are a waste of money. The best ones are at optimum levels. Everyone needs to at least take a mega antioxidant, a multi-mineral, a calcium/magnesium and omega-3 supplements.

    8. Check your attitude. Do you look for solutions or do you focus on the problems? Do you look for good in people or do you enjoy criticising? Do you work at being positive or negative? It’s your choice what you think – so choose wisely. This is a video of man who is making the most of what he has got.

    9. Have fun! Look after your friends and family. Make new friends. Share, laugh and cry together. Contribute to your community – giving is far more rewarding than receiving.

    10. Last but not least – visit your dentist. Yes, attractive looking teeth make us look younger and not only that, good oral health is vital for our health. This is a tip that is often overlooked. My journey over the last nine years has awakened me to the health benefits of good oral health. And on top of that, I am married to a dentist who has also been educating me about the toxic nature of mercury amalgam fillings. By going to your dentist regularly you will be helped to keep gum disease and tooth decay at bay. Bacteria in the mouth contributes to inflammation which may lead to heart disease and diabetes. If you have mercury amalgam fillings consider having them removed safely and replaced with natural white coloured fillings for younger looking teeth. Click here for more oral health information.

    For women 40+ who want to live life to the full and stay younger longer

    If you would like to find out which nutritional supplements are recommended for healthy aging, please request my free eBook, by completing the form on your top right.

    I trust you found this helpful. If you did, please share it with others by clicking on the Facebook and/or Twitter icons below. And be sure to leave your comments and questions below. Thank you!

  • May 7

    How does sleep affect aging? Different people thrive on different amounts of sleep. Research shows that we get the best quality of sleep between the hours of 10pm and 2am. Why is it important to sleep early? Between the hours of 11pm and 1am, your body’s adrenals undergo recovery and recharging. Lack of good quality sleep will affect how we age.

    The consequences of insufficient sleep are:
    1. Viral infections
    2. Weight gain
    3. Diabetes Mellitus Type 2
    4. High blood pressure
    5. Heart disease
    6. Mental Illness
    7. Mortality

    What can you do if you cannot sleep?

    First of all, look at your lifestyle –
    * Do you get daily exercise?
    * Get your Vitamin D levels checked. Restless sleep may be caused by Vitamin D3 deficiency.
    * Are you taking prescription medicine that may be interfering with your sleep?
    * Hormonal issues? – going through menopause can cause sleep disturbance – find a doctor who will check your hormone levels and who prescribes ONLY Bioidentical Hormones. Buy the book ‘Breakthrough’ by Suzanne Somers (link below) and read chapter 22.
    * Do you abstain from drinking excessive alcohol? (best to avoid alcohol if insomnia is a problem)
    * Avoid caffeine (it’s a bladder irritant)
    * Do you meditate to empty your brain of thoughts?
    * Do you have your last meal/snack at least 4 hours before retiring?
    * Is your bedroom darkened?
    * Cover your bedroom mirrors if their reflections make you feel unsafe
    * Is your bedroom quiet?
    * Is your bed comfortable?
    * Develop and adhere to a ‘going to sleep’ ritual
    * Consider purchasing a magnetic bed system
    * Don’t watch, read or listen to anything that might be disturbing before bedtime which might activate your sympathetic nervous system
    *Avoid emotionally stressful discussions or potentially difficult phone calls near bedtime
    * Don’t stew over worries, things not said, things not done or what you have to do tomorrow
    * Put your worries to bed by writing them down so you don’t have to think about them

    Secondly, you may find it helpful to get out of bed and find a warm, comfortable place to read quietly for half an hour, have a small glass of water and then return to bed.

    Thirdly, you may wish to consider taking supplements such as melatonin and/or a high quality calcium/magnesium supplement.

    Calcium and magnesium helps with the expansion and contraction of muscles, with magnesium supporting the relaxation of muscles throughout our bodies. Women need extra calcium (daily intake 1200mg pre-menopause and 1500mg post-menopause), as we age. Calcium has a calming effect on the nervous system, helps promote restful and high quality sleep, and is good to take right at bedtime. Take calcium with magnesium and Vitamin D for best absorption. Magnesium has a calming effect on the brain and nervous system, and is important for good sleep. It’s a natural sedative and helps the body absorb calcium. A suggested daily magnesium intake is 300mg-500mg. Take your calcium/magnesium supplement along with good quality multivitamin/multimineral to promote the reduction of the effects of stress. Nutrition for good sleep is not instantaneous but may be helpful over time.

    We need to sleep in a darkened room so that our bodies can produce melatonin. Melatonin is useful in many important relationships in promoting sleep, mood, and sex drive, reducing depression and the rate of aging, and helping maintain freedom from cancer, diabetes, heart disease and chronic disease in general.

    Other natural sleep aids are Natural Progesterone, Kava Kava, Valerian and 5-HTP. These can lose their effectiveness over time so it’s best to use them sparingly, and only after you have tried other routes to a good night’s sleep.

    With thanks to Doctor Christiane Northrup “The Wisdom of Menopause” for additional points.

    Here is what Dr Mercola has to say about sleep:
    “Too little sleep impacts your levels of thyroid and stress hormones, which in turn can affect your memory and immune system, your heart and metabolism, and much more. Over time, lack of sleep can lead to:
    Weight gain
    Depression
    High blood sugar levels and an increased risk of diabetes
    Brain damage
    The consequences of sleep deprivation are so intense because your circadian rhythm has evolved over hundreds of generations to align your physiology with your environment, and your body clock assumes that, like your ancestors, you sleep at night and stay awake during daylight hours.

    If you confuse the situation by depriving yourself of enough hours of sleep, you send conflicting signals to your body. For instance, in addition to the above, too little sleep can:

    Increase your risk of cancer by altering the balance of hormones in your body
    Accelerate aging
    Increase your risk of heart disease and stroke
    Raise your blood pressure
    Speed up tumor growth. Tumors grow two to three times faster in laboratory animals with severe sleep dysfunctions
    Sleep researchers from across the United States have also discovered that:

    A single night of sleeping only four to six hours can impact your ability to think clearly the next day.
    Sleep deprivation can cause changes in your brain activity similar to those experienced by people with psychiatric disorders.
    Additionally, your body does most of its repairs during sleep, so not getting enough of it can impair your immune system, leaving you less able to fight off diseases of ALL kinds.”

    Find out which advanced quality nutritional products I use and recommend.

    Purchase The Harvard Medical School Guide to ‘A Good Night’s Sleep’

    Breakthrough by Suzanne Somers is a remarkable book with enlightening information from doctors who are at the forefront of antiaging medicine (for a healthy long life). This book may be a bit technical in places but you will become empowered with knowledge.

    For women 40+ who want to live life to the full and stay younger longer

    If you would like to find out which nutritional supplements are recommended for healthy aging, please request my free eBook, by completing the form on your top right.

    I trust you found this helpful. If you did, please share it with others by clicking on the Facebook and/or Twitter icons below. And be sure to leave your comments and questions below. Thank you!

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