Healthy Aging Resources

Live Life to the Full in Optimal Health

  • Sep 12

    Many health problems originate in our gut. How much time do we give to chewing our food properly let alone prepare healthy food in this rushed world we live in? A healthy digestive system is a multi-faceted process; one important part being getting the nutrients from our food to supply our cells needs and another part is elimination.

    The GI tract is the largest part of the immune system because it deals with eliminating toxins and filters fungi, bacteria, viruses and parasites. The GI tract is sometimes referred to as the ‘second brain’.

    Having optimal health means living pain free and not having to suffer with digestive issues like constipation, indigestion, irritable bowel syndrome, coughing, phlegm, reflux or bloating.

    From a supplement point of view there are three things that aid the digestion of our food and support the health of our GI tract.

    1. Liver support

    It is so important to keep our livers healthy for without them, we die. Our liver is part of the detoxification process and is vital to keeping our bodies clear of the toxins we accumulate from our food and environment. Milk-thistle is a key ingredient in liver health and works as an antioxidant. Green-tea extract, turmeric and broccoli extract provide further antioxidant protection.

    2. Healthy gut flora

    Probiotics are millions of viable good bacteria that help to maintain healthy gut flora, they have been clinically proven to survive transit through the acidic environment of the stomach and to reach the intestine alive.

    Probiotics Promote Balance: Your gut is host to both beneficial and potentially harmful bacteria. When balanced properly, these bacteria, also known as microflora, aid healthy digestion. Stress, illness, antibiotics and/or medicines, poor diet and hydration, lack of rest, and harmful environmental conditions, however, may endanger the fine balance of the intestinal flora. This imbalance can result in the reduction of beneficial bacteria in the gut, which can lead to digestive concerns that may not only be physically uncomfortable but also possibly harmful to your health.

    Not all probiotics are of sufficient quantity of high-quality bacteria strains to survive stomach acidity and enter the intestinal tract alive to be effective. Look out for strains of probiotic bacteria that have been clinically proven to survive transit through the acidic environment of the stomach, and promote a natural balance of beneficial microflora in the gut.

    3. Bowel health
    Prebiotics are made up of multiple sources of soluble and insoluble dietary fibre including Psyllium and Inulin which promotes the growth of healthy bacteria in the digestive tract.

    Prebiotics promote good digestive health, and aids in normal bowel regularity, which helps move wastes and toxins out of the colon. Undigested food material and metabolic waste build up in the body due to slow elimination, which may contribute to other health problems.

    Psyllium is a rich source of soluble fibre, and a bulking agent. It has been widely used to promote bowel movement.

    Inulin is a special type of indigestible fibre that serves as a fertilizer to healthy bacteria in the digestive system, which in turn assists in the absorption of nutrients and the breakdown of foods. If undigested food material and metabolic waste build up due to slow elimination, it may contribute to other health problems.

    How much fibre do we need to consume?
    According to the Nutrient Reference Values for Australia and New Zealand (developed by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) and the Department of Health)…
    • adult women should eat at least 25 grams of fibre daily
    • men should eat at least 30 grams
    • pregnant women over the age of 18 should consume 28 grams of fibre every day
    • New mothers need 27-30 grams each day.

    We still need to consciously eat a healthy diet and to eliminate sugary drinks to avoid putting toxic stress on our body’s cells. By ensuring that our digestive system is in healthy working order, we can then utilize all the nutrients from the food we eat, as well as feel comfortable in the downstairs department. Please feel free to contact me if you need any help choosing products to support a healthy digestive system.

    Please note: Symptoms of ovarian cancer are nonspecific and mimic those of many other more common conditions, including digestive and bladder disorders. A woman with ovarian cancer may be diagnosed with another condition before finally learning she has cancer. Common misdiagnoses include irritable bowel syndrome, stress and depression. Read more…

    The digestive process is described in great detail in Suzanne Somers’ book ‘Breakthrough’ Step 4 “Create a Healthy GI tract”. According to Ms Somers, some of the diseases that start in the gut are arthritis, diabetes, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, Alzheimer’s, Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Macular Degeneration.
    Get your copy of “Breakthrough” now from Amazon.com

    I trust you found this helpful. If you did, please share it with others by clicking on the Facebook and/or Twitter icons below. And be sure to leave your comments and questions below. Thank you!

  • Aug 19

    A review of the book “Breakthrough – Eight Steps to Wellness, Life-altering secrets from today’s cutting-edge doctors” by Suzanne Somers

    When I began to read “Breakthrough- Eight Steps to Wellness” my head was spinning. There is so much valuable information here and I wanted to soak it all up. Suzanne has interviewed 17 medical professionals who are at the cutting-edge of long-term anti-aging medicine. The book has 450 pages of life-altering secrets and it is packed into small print. If you want to live the rest of your life in vibrant optimum health – then this book is a must-read.

    To quote Suzanne ‘Knowledge is power’. To anyone (and really everyone) who would like to enhance their health knowledge, then this book will certainly fill in many gaps. We can all be responsible for our own true health once we become armed with knowledge.

    For me I had never heard of new technologies such as nanotechnology, stem cells and energy medicine. I did not understand the significance of bioidentical hormone therapy. I now have a deeper understanding as to why nutritional supplements are so vital for our well-being. The people who are at the cutting-edge of this new technology are passionate about what they are achieving.

    I strongly suggest that you get your own copy of Suzanne’s book and read it with an open-mind.

    Get your copy of “Breakthrough” now from Amazon.com

    Read what Suzanne Somers has to say about curing and preventing cancer -(right click on this link) an interview about her book ‘Knockout’.

    For women 40+ who want to live life to the full and stay younger longer

    If you would like to find out which nutritional supplements are recommended for healthy aging, please request my free eBook, by completing the form on your top right.

    I trust you found this helpful. If you did, please share it with others by clicking on the Facebook and/or Twitter icons below. And be sure to leave your comments and questions below. Thank you!

  • Jul 19

    Many of us take our health for granted until we lose it. And then, instead of thriving we start surviving. Others are proactive with their health. It may take a serious illness in the family or amongst friends to give us a wake-up call or it may be just a realization that it is up to us to become more responsible for our own health. So what is the difference between healthy aging and anti-aging?

    Suzanne Somers defines the eight anti-aging steps in her book ‘Breakthrough’ as being:
    1. Get Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy
    2. Avoid Chemicals and Detoxify your body
    3. Take nutrition seriously
    4. Create a healthy GI tract
    5. Avoid Pharmaceuticals unless absolutely necessary
    6. Supplement your diet
    7. Exercise regularly
    8. Get proper sleep

    In an ideal world these steps are certainly ones to aspire to. I would also add another step:
    9. Visit your dentist every 6-12 months so that dental decay, gum disease and high bacteria levels can be treated in the early stages. This is a step that people often overlook. Inflammation in the mouth can cause heart disease and diabetes. Find a dentist who has the philosphy of ‘find it early, treat it while it’s small’ – this will prevent pain in your mouth, in your body and your pocket down the track.

    With respect to step 6 – supplement your diet, I believe that this is a vital step for our well-being. Our environment is not as healthy as it was in our grandparent’s days – it is difficult to avoid the chemicals and toxins that are in the air and the food and water that we consume. To fight the extra free radicals that our body is producing, it is imperative that we use advanced quality nutriceutical antioxidants, multi-minerals, multi-vitamins and omega-3.

    I would define Healthy Aging as all of the above, except I would leave out:
    1. Get Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy.
    For many people this step is too expensive. Not only do we have to find a Bioidentical medical specialist and pay them, we also have to pay for the therapy. However, if our hormones do require balancing to improve a health condition I would certainly consider this option.

    If you do not have a health condition by adding steps 2 to 9 with step 3 being a healthy diet of “Technicolor” fresh fruits and vegetables, very low sugar, low GI foods, avoiding processed foods, our hormones should be in healthy balance albeit declining as we age.

    My intention is to live a long and healthy life which will provide me with the vitality to have fun and to inspire others. What are your long-term health plans and what are you going to do to ensure that your health goals will be achieved?

    For women 40+ who want to live life to the full and stay younger longer

    If you would like to find out which nutritional supplements are recommended for healthy aging, please request my free eBook, by completing the form on your top right.

    I trust you found this helpful. If you did, please share it with others by clicking on the Facebook and/or Twitter icons below. And be sure to leave your comments and questions below. Thank you!

  • May 7

    How does sleep affect aging? Different people thrive on different amounts of sleep. Research shows that we get the best quality of sleep between the hours of 10pm and 2am. Why is it important to sleep early? Between the hours of 11pm and 1am, your body’s adrenals undergo recovery and recharging. Lack of good quality sleep will affect how we age.

    The consequences of insufficient sleep are:
    1. Viral infections
    2. Weight gain
    3. Diabetes Mellitus Type 2
    4. High blood pressure
    5. Heart disease
    6. Mental Illness
    7. Mortality

    What can you do if you cannot sleep?

    First of all, look at your lifestyle –
    * Do you get daily exercise?
    * Get your Vitamin D levels checked. Restless sleep may be caused by Vitamin D3 deficiency.
    * Are you taking prescription medicine that may be interfering with your sleep?
    * Hormonal issues? – going through menopause can cause sleep disturbance – find a doctor who will check your hormone levels and who prescribes ONLY Bioidentical Hormones. Buy the book ‘Breakthrough’ by Suzanne Somers (link below) and read chapter 22.
    * Do you abstain from drinking excessive alcohol? (best to avoid alcohol if insomnia is a problem)
    * Avoid caffeine (it’s a bladder irritant)
    * Do you meditate to empty your brain of thoughts?
    * Do you have your last meal/snack at least 4 hours before retiring?
    * Is your bedroom darkened?
    * Cover your bedroom mirrors if their reflections make you feel unsafe
    * Is your bedroom quiet?
    * Is your bed comfortable?
    * Develop and adhere to a ‘going to sleep’ ritual
    * Consider purchasing a magnetic bed system
    * Don’t watch, read or listen to anything that might be disturbing before bedtime which might activate your sympathetic nervous system
    *Avoid emotionally stressful discussions or potentially difficult phone calls near bedtime
    * Don’t stew over worries, things not said, things not done or what you have to do tomorrow
    * Put your worries to bed by writing them down so you don’t have to think about them

    Secondly, you may find it helpful to get out of bed and find a warm, comfortable place to read quietly for half an hour, have a small glass of water and then return to bed.

    Thirdly, you may wish to consider taking supplements such as melatonin and/or a high quality calcium/magnesium supplement.

    Calcium and magnesium helps with the expansion and contraction of muscles, with magnesium supporting the relaxation of muscles throughout our bodies. Women need extra calcium (daily intake 1200mg pre-menopause and 1500mg post-menopause), as we age. Calcium has a calming effect on the nervous system, helps promote restful and high quality sleep, and is good to take right at bedtime. Take calcium with magnesium and Vitamin D for best absorption. Magnesium has a calming effect on the brain and nervous system, and is important for good sleep. It’s a natural sedative and helps the body absorb calcium. A suggested daily magnesium intake is 300mg-500mg. Take your calcium/magnesium supplement along with good quality multivitamin/multimineral to promote the reduction of the effects of stress. Nutrition for good sleep is not instantaneous but may be helpful over time.

    We need to sleep in a darkened room so that our bodies can produce melatonin. Melatonin is useful in many important relationships in promoting sleep, mood, and sex drive, reducing depression and the rate of aging, and helping maintain freedom from cancer, diabetes, heart disease and chronic disease in general.

    Other natural sleep aids are Natural Progesterone, Kava Kava, Valerian and 5-HTP. These can lose their effectiveness over time so it’s best to use them sparingly, and only after you have tried other routes to a good night’s sleep.

    With thanks to Doctor Christiane Northrup “The Wisdom of Menopause” for additional points.

    Here is what Dr Mercola has to say about sleep:
    “Too little sleep impacts your levels of thyroid and stress hormones, which in turn can affect your memory and immune system, your heart and metabolism, and much more. Over time, lack of sleep can lead to:
    Weight gain
    Depression
    High blood sugar levels and an increased risk of diabetes
    Brain damage
    The consequences of sleep deprivation are so intense because your circadian rhythm has evolved over hundreds of generations to align your physiology with your environment, and your body clock assumes that, like your ancestors, you sleep at night and stay awake during daylight hours.

    If you confuse the situation by depriving yourself of enough hours of sleep, you send conflicting signals to your body. For instance, in addition to the above, too little sleep can:

    Increase your risk of cancer by altering the balance of hormones in your body
    Accelerate aging
    Increase your risk of heart disease and stroke
    Raise your blood pressure
    Speed up tumor growth. Tumors grow two to three times faster in laboratory animals with severe sleep dysfunctions
    Sleep researchers from across the United States have also discovered that:

    A single night of sleeping only four to six hours can impact your ability to think clearly the next day.
    Sleep deprivation can cause changes in your brain activity similar to those experienced by people with psychiatric disorders.
    Additionally, your body does most of its repairs during sleep, so not getting enough of it can impair your immune system, leaving you less able to fight off diseases of ALL kinds.”

    Find out which advanced quality nutritional products I use and recommend.

    Purchase The Harvard Medical School Guide to ‘A Good Night’s Sleep’

    Breakthrough by Suzanne Somers is a remarkable book with enlightening information from doctors who are at the forefront of antiaging medicine (for a healthy long life). This book may be a bit technical in places but you will become empowered with knowledge.

    For women 40+ who want to live life to the full and stay younger longer

    If you would like to find out which nutritional supplements are recommended for healthy aging, please request my free eBook, by completing the form on your top right.

    I trust you found this helpful. If you did, please share it with others by clicking on the Facebook and/or Twitter icons below. And be sure to leave your comments and questions below. Thank you!

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