Healthy Aging Resources

Live Life to the Full in Optimal Health

  • Jul 19

    Many of us take our health for granted until we lose it. And then, instead of thriving we start surviving. Others are proactive with their health. It may take a serious illness in the family or amongst friends to give us a wake-up call or it may be just a realization that it is up to us to become more responsible for our own health. So what is the difference between healthy aging and anti-aging?

    Suzanne Somers defines the eight anti-aging steps in her book ‘Breakthrough’ as being:
    1. Get Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy
    2. Avoid Chemicals and Detoxify your body
    3. Take nutrition seriously
    4. Create a healthy GI tract
    5. Avoid Pharmaceuticals unless absolutely necessary
    6. Supplement your diet
    7. Exercise regularly
    8. Get proper sleep

    In an ideal world these steps are certainly ones to aspire to. I would also add another step:
    9. Visit your dentist every 6-12 months so that dental decay, gum disease and high bacteria levels can be treated in the early stages. This is a step that people often overlook. Inflammation in the mouth can cause heart disease and diabetes. Find a dentist who has the philosphy of ‘find it early, treat it while it’s small’ – this will prevent pain in your mouth, in your body and your pocket down the track.

    With respect to step 6 – supplement your diet, I believe that this is a vital step for our well-being. Our environment is not as healthy as it was in our grandparent’s days – it is difficult to avoid the chemicals and toxins that are in the air and the food and water that we consume. To fight the extra free radicals that our body is producing, it is imperative that we use advanced quality nutriceutical antioxidants, multi-minerals, multi-vitamins and omega-3.

    I would define Healthy Aging as all of the above, except I would leave out:
    1. Get Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy.
    For many people this step is too expensive. Not only do we have to find a Bioidentical medical specialist and pay them, we also have to pay for the therapy. However, if our hormones do require balancing to improve a health condition I would certainly consider this option.

    If you do not have a health condition by adding steps 2 to 9 with step 3 being a healthy diet of “Technicolor” fresh fruits and vegetables, very low sugar, low GI foods, avoiding processed foods, our hormones should be in healthy balance albeit declining as we age.

    My intention is to live a long and healthy life which will provide me with the vitality to have fun and to inspire others. What are your long-term health plans and what are you going to do to ensure that your health goals will be achieved?

    For women 40+ who want to live life to the full and stay younger longer

    If you would like to find out which nutritional supplements are recommended for healthy aging, please request my free eBook, by completing the form on your top right.

    I trust you found this helpful. If you did, please share it with others by clicking on the Facebook and/or Twitter icons below. And be sure to leave your comments and questions below. Thank you!

  • Jun 29

    About two years ago, a friend of mine who is in her 40’s came to me for advice about arthritis. Her doctor had told her that her neck was like a 65 year olds. Not only did she have arthritis in her neck, but in her feet as well. My friend is passionate about horse riding – how much longer will she be able to do that? How do we prevent and care for Arthritis?

    Both my parents had arthritis – my father’s was in his feet and hands, my mother’s in her back. My husband has arthritis in his knee – a result of a rugby injury and having cartilage removed. Arthritis is both painful and debilitating.

    What causes arthritis?
    There are two types of arthritis – osteoarthritis (the most common, caused by wear and tear) and rheumatoid arthritis (inflammation of the joints due to an autoimmune disease).

    Doctor Ray Strand says “Osteoarthritis is a degenerative process within the joints. Over 70% of the people over 50 years of age have some degree of degenerative arthritis. This is not a disease that will typically shorten one’s life, but will certainly cause significant pain and disability if left untreated.
    “When researchers study joint fluid extracted from an inflamed joint, they note a significant increase in the number of excessive free radicals. In contrast, fluid from a normal joint has no free radicals present. Studies have shown a significant increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis in those individuals who have low levels of Vitamin E, beta-carotene, and selenium. Research has further indicated low levels of vitamin D and Vitamin C in patients suffering severe joint disease and whose disease progresses much more rapidly than the norm”.

    My horse-riding friend is a ‘health nut’ – she eats organic food and has a healthy lifestyle. But that hasn’t been enough to prevent Osteoarthritis. My suggestion is to add advanced-quality broad spectrum supplements to a healthy lifestyle to support healthy joints and bones. And to also continue with exercise to maintain fitness, muscle strength, heart health, relieve pain and stiffness and to get better quality of sleep.

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease – caused by a virus or bacteria. The immune system becomes confused and it attacks itself rather than the bacteria or virus. The joints become inflamed causing chronic inflammation, pain and joint swelling; and the joint fluid which is usually thick becomes thin, so the cartilage becomes less protective.

    Further Reading
    (NaturalNews) A recent study from the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, Minnesota, has found that rheumatoid arthritis is on the increase among Caucasian women. And the culprit is likely an environmental one, like vitamin D deficiency, rather than a genetic one.

    Do Glucosamine Supplements Work? an article by ‘Nutrition Diva’ Monica Reinagel, M.S., L.D./N.

    Very informative article from the Linus Pauling Institute about Vitamin D and the health impact of not having enough of this critical vitamin in your body.

    If you would like to find out which nutritional supplements are recommended for joint health, please request my free eBook, by completing the form on your top right.

    I trust you found this helpful. If you did, please share it with others by clicking on the Facebook and/or Twitter icons below. And be sure to leave your comments and questions below. Thank you!

  • Apr 24

    What is an antiaging skin diet? As I have become older, I have found it harder to control weight gain. Because of this, I began to research what causes this constant battle. Whereas in our teens and early 20’s we have a hunger for carbs however, as we age we do need to be more discerning about the types of carbs we eat. I love the smell of freshly baked bread but that is one of the things I have learned to reduce in my diet and to increase the amount of fresh fruit and vegetables. As you will read here, not only is a low glycemic diet helpful for weight management but it also keeps our skin healthier and less wrinkled too.

    The Great Skin Diet

    Tuesday, March 2, 2010 at 11:33am

    AVOID HIGH GLYCEMIC FOODS ~ Carbs and sugars
    Carbs are found in foods like white bread, rice, pasta and potatoes. Not surprisingly, sweet treats, such as cookies, cake and candy, are full of sugar.

    HIGH GLYCEMIC FOODS: Our bodies convert carbs and sugar to blood glucose very quickly. The measure of how long this takes is called the glycemic index. Foods quickly converted to glucose are high-glycemic.

    o If we load up on carbs and sugars, our glucose levels go up. When the glucose level is too high, the body increases its production of insulin to get it back down.

    o So what happens to skin when our insulin levels are too high? Oil production rises and skin cells die quicker. Oil and dead skin cells block pores, which can lead to acne breakouts. Not surprisingly, studies show a correlation between a high-glycemic diet and acne.

    RISK OF WRINKLES: Sugar binds to skin protein, causing wrinkles, a binding process called glycation.

    o After these sugar/skin protein bonds are made, damaging structures called advanced glycation end products — or AGEs, for short — are formed. AGEs destroy collagen (which keeps skin firm), causing wrinkles. Then, free radicals are created, which damage skin cells.

    o Particularly in people over age 35, the effects of glycation become stronger. Diabetics are also highly affected by glycation: they “can have up to 50 times the number of AGEs in their skin as those who don’t have diabetes.

    o Cut down high glycemic foods if you’ve got: Oily skin, acne or wrinkles. Keep added sugar to no more than 10 percent of total calories you consume in a day. Also, limit other types of sugar, including like corn syrup and dextrose.

    o Enjoy clear, wrinkle-free skin by avoiding high glycemic foods ~ you’ll thank me later! 😀

    Marie Bertrand
    Microbiologist and Skin Scientist
    SkinScience Clinic | www.skinscience.md

    For women 40+ who want to live life to the full and stay younger longer

    If you would like to find out which nutritional supplements are recommended for healthy beautiful skin, please request my free eBook, by completing the form on your top right.

    I trust you found this helpful. If you did, please share it with others by clicking on the Facebook and/or Twitter icons below. And be sure to leave your comments and questions below. Thank you!

Archives