Healthy Aging Resources

Live Life to the Full in Optimal Health

  • Aug 14

    On the 5th May 2011 I find out that I have an ‘under-active’ or ‘low’ thyroid (also called hypothroidism). This post explains the program I embarked on to overcome my under active thyroid.

    Read my post: How to support your thyroid

    August 2012: I have since learned the following from Dr Steven Gundry 

     

     

     

     

    My symptoms (and there are many others): Being overweight and feeling the cold terribly (it is now winter in New Zealand).

    I had no idea that my thyroid was not healthy, but once I found out it explained why I find it difficult to release weight (my metabolism was not working correctly).

    Program for under active thyroid

    The program I was put on involved taking my usual nutritional supplements (advanced quality multi minerals/vitamins, vitamin D3, CoQ10, vitamin C, Calcium/Magnesium tablet, grape seed extract and omega-3 capsules) and adding in Iodral (iodine). Once the Iodral is finished, I have been advised to eat seaweed (add to food, sprinkle on salads) to keep up my iodine levels.

    I set a goal to walk for one hour every day using wrist and ankle weights (I did not achieve that every day – more like 4 out of 7 days due to the winter weather and other commitments).

    I ensured that I was drinking 1 1/2 litres of water daily.

    I avoided products containing soy.

    Three months later and my thyroid is ‘normal’.

    This means that I now will find it easier to release the 10kgs of fat that has been clinging to my body.

    My goal is to release fat so that I can reach a healthy weight by Christmas Day 2011 and then I can wear a beautiful dress I have hanging in my wardrobe, that at present is too small for me.
    I am looking forward to letting you know when I have reached that goal.

    Update April 2013 – I am slowly getting closer to my goal weight of 64kgs, currently just over 67kgs.  I am finding that it very easy to keep to Dr Steven Gundry’s Diet Evolution program. I have dropped a dress size.  My ‘wheat belly’ has shrunk. I can wear skirts again because my backside has shrunk! I have heaps more energy and I feel very happy.

    DSC00209

    April 2013

    June 2011
    June 2011

     

  • Jun 30

    How do we find out if our thyroid is healthy?  I had given no thought to this question so was surprised to find out that I have an ‘under active’ or ‘low’ thyroid (also called hypothroidism). Learn what you can do to support your thyroid health.

    According to Doctor Ray Strand, Hypothyroidism or under active thyroid occurs when the thyroid gland is destroyed or is not producing needed amounts of thyroid hormone. This condition has also been called myxedema due to the potential harm possible to the body when there is no thyroid hormone. Patients can become edematous (filled with fluid), weak and fatigued, intolerant to cold, experience abnormal weight gain, notice changes in their skin and hair, and may suffer from total body pain. They can also develop congestive heart failure as well as significant increase in their cholesterol levels.

    Learn more:  What does the thyroid do and where is it located?

    My main symptom is being overweight (which of course leads to other problems like diabetes, heart disease and cancer), the other symptom is that I  feel the cold terribly (it is now winter in New Zealand). There are other symptoms so the best thing to do is to get screened.  (List of symptoms from the Mayo Clinic here.)

    There are two ways to get the health of our thyroid checked out – the usual way is by a blood test.  But this may not be as accurate as a Thyroflex test  – in this video, Naturopath David Holden explains the Thyroflex test.

    The other test that I had done was the VLA Test and that indicated that I need to exercise more to build up more muscle.  My healthy low-glycemic diet and the supplements that I take have kept me in good health – so the ‘only’ thing I need to work on is exercise.

    The nutritional supplements to support a healthy thyroid are advanced quality multi minerals/vitamins, vitamin D3, CoQ10, vitamin C. Plus “Iodral” with supervision from your doctor or Naturopath.  I also take a Calcium/Magnesium tablet, grape seed extract and omega-3 capsules.  I am ensuring that I am drinking 1 1/2 litres of water daily and avoiding soy products for the time being.

    My blood test results showed that my blood sugar levels are slightly elevated – again exercise is the key here too.

    The exercise I enjoy is walking (so much so, I have a website ‘Short Walks in Auckland‘), however I hate walking in the cold and wet of winter.  But I must get out walking every day for one hour – so I will.

    For sufferers of Hashimotos, Dr Steven Gundry suggests the following: “Most gluten free foods are made from corn, rice, and potatoes, all of which are lectins which contribute to Hashimotos. Please eliminate all grains, all peppers, potatoes, milk and milk products. You can have goat and sheep products. No pseudograins like quinoa! No Advil or Aleve. No stomach acid suppressants like Prilosec or Nexium. You will start to heal.”

    My goal is to release fat so that I can reach a healthy weight by Christmas Day 2011 and then I can wear a beautiful dress I have hanging in my wardrobe, that at present is too small for me.

    I am looking forward to letting you know when I have reached that goal.

    This is a photo of me on holiday in Australia last week:

    Healthy Aging Resources

  • Oct 17

    Nutritional SupplementsRecently a friend was staying with me and was curious about my supplements. I take a basic “wellness” program plus enhancers. I recommend the basic wellness program to people who are happy with their health and wish to maintain the status quo. For others who wish to prevent certain health issues, then a nutritional supplement program can be tailored taking into account their nutritional requirements and their budget. As we age, I feel that we need extra nutritional support for our long-term health.

    I would like to stress that taking supplements is no substitute for a healthy diet – we must avoid processed foods and eat lots of fresh fruit and vegetables. Exercise and getting out into the fresh air and sunshine is important for our good health.

    There are many more toxins and chemicals in our environment now compared to pre World War Two and our bodies require high-quality and optimum nutrition to combat these onslaughts.

    The basic wellness program:
    1. Antioxidants and multi-vitamins – whilst it is important to eat a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables, we have no way of knowing how much nutrition is available or how fresh the products are that we purchase. Plus we do not know how much free radical damage is occurring in our bodies. So we need to keep our body’s cells ‘oiled’ to prevent the internal ‘rust’.

    2. Multi-minerals – Vitamins and enzymes cannot function without minerals. Minerals are missing from our soils, and thus our food. Minerals must be in a form that is readily absorbed by the body (i.e. bioavailable).

    3. Calcium/magnesium/vitamin D3 – vital for our bone health. Calcium supports strong bones, tissues and teeth, as well as healthy cartilage, joints and muscular activity – keeps you standing tall. All three nutrients work in synergy and keep our bones strong. Calcium and magnesium are also necessary to support healthy blood pressure.

    4. Omega-3 – from fish oil or flaxseed oil. Much research has been done on this nutrient. All cells in our body require omega-3.

    5. Fiber – An added option to the basic wellness program is a Fiber product. Fiber is necessary for our indigestion, and many people with health issues do not get enough fiber in their diet.

    Enhancers I add to my program:

    Glucosamine sulfate/Vitamin C/Manganese/Turmeric
    Both my parents suffered from arthritis. This product is the building block of healthy cartilage. The body does repair damaged cartilage but if the building blocks are not available then joint pain and osteoarthritis may result.
    Grape Seed Extract
    Before I started taking supplements, I used to get 3-4 colds/flu a year plus I suffered from hay fever and sinusitis. Grape Seed Extract helps in relieving the symptoms of colds plus is an excellent source of health-assisting antioxidants. Grape Seed Extract is naturally high in silicon, a mineral essential for healthy, soft, smooth skin. Grape Seed Extract may keep collagen, elastin and hyaluronic acid within the skin in good shape by blocking enzymes that might disrupt their chemical structure. Its flavonoids also inhibit allergic reactions that can generate skin problems.
    Phytoestrogens and soy isoflavones
    These provide a natural approach to maintaining health before and after menopause. Phytoestrogens in the diet are believed to be a stabilizing factor throughout hormonal cycles. This stabilization may help to maintain bone mass into the mature years. Always check the source of soy products because many these days are GMO.
    Vitamin C
    Vitamin C is essential for collagen synthesis. Collagen is essential for strengthening muscles, teeth bones, skin and blood vessels. Human bodies are incapable of manufacturing vitamin C so we must rely on our diet to satisfy our daily requirement.
    Vitamin D3
    Vitamin D3 plays an important role in helping the body absorb calcium and in bone mineralization, supports a robust and healthy immune system, important for the maintenance of muscle strength to prevent body sway and increased risk of falling. Accumulating scientific evidence is proving that Vitamin D provides more health benefits than simply bone health. Deficiency has been associated with increased risk of common cancers, autoimmune diseases, hypertension, and infectious diseases. Evidence is emerging that there is wide spread vitamin D deficiency in the broader population. People are covering up when outside in the sun to prevent skin cancer and many others are their spending days inside, and not getting any sun exposure at all. We need sun exposure for the body to make Vitamin D. Vitamin D is currently heavily researched – for up-to-date information visit the Vitamin D Council. Get your Vitamin D levels tested by your doctor to ensure that you are not deficient (“25 OH Vitamin D” blood test (also known as “25 hydroxy vitamin D”) and you want to be in the 50-80 ng/ml range).

    From time to time, I will take these two extra products to ensure good digestive health:
    Probiotics
    Probiotics help to maintain healthy gut flora. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common diagnosis in gastroenterology. Reduced quality of life caused by IBS affects approximately 20% of adult Westerners. Studies suggest certain probiotics to be beneficial, and provide a promising therapeutic alternative.
    Milk Thistle
    To help support healthy liver function and normal detoxification process

    Both my parents suffered from heart disease. My mother died from a heart attack after many years on blood pressure medication. My mother also suffered from diverticulitis for many years. My father had a triple bypass heart operation and eventually died as a result of prostate cancer. My parents never discovered the benefits of nutritional supplementation. My aim is to stay healthy until the day I die, which is why I am being proactive now.

    For women 40+ who want to live life to the full and stay younger longer

    If you would like to find out which nutritional supplements are recommended for healthy aging, please request my free eBook, by completing the form on your top right.

     

    I trust you found this helpful. If you did, please share it with others by clicking on the Facebook and/or Twitter icons below. And be sure to leave your comments and questions below. Thank you!

  • Jul 31

    The headlines screamed on the 29th July 2010. Results from a study by researchers were published in the British Medical Journal and reported by (Reuters) – Calcium supplements, which many people consume hoping to ward off osteoporosis, may increase the risk of heart attack by as much as 30 percent, researchers reported Friday. What the study found was that there was a 30 per cent increase in heart attacks in the people who were randomized to take calcium. The researchers conducted an analysis of results from 11 studies.

    I am left with a few questions but no answers:
    1) Why were these studies done?
    2) Who paid for the studies?
    3) What type of calcium was used? (Chelated calcium is bioavailable to our cells)
    4) What was the dosage?
    5) Did the calcium supplements also contain magnesium and Vitamin D3? (Magnesium and Vitamin D3 are required to be present for the body to utilize calcium)
    6) Have there been more than 11 studies done? If so, why were they all not included?
    7) What was the initial state of health of the participants?

    It is no wonder that we, the general public get confused when we read these headlines. One minute we are told that calcium is good for us and we need to have more of it…
    (Reuters Health) – Getting a bit more calcium in your diet could help you live longer, new research suggests.

    Another piece of research shows the benefits of calcium:
    High magnesium and calcium intake linked to lower diabetes risk

    It is well known that diet plays an important role in the development of type 2 diabetes, but less is known about the influence of specific nutrients on non-Western populations. A report published in the March 2009 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition revealed a protective effect of calcium and magnesium against diabetes in a large group of Chinese women.

    The study involved 64,191 women participated in the Shanghai Women’s Health Study, living in Shanghai, China. Analysis of dietary questionnaire responses determined calcium and magnesium intake.

    Women whose intake was in the highest group at an average of 649.6 milligrams per day had a 27 percent lower risk of diabetes than those whose intake was in the lowest group at 277.5 milligrams. Women whose intake of magnesium was highest at an average of 318.1 milligrams per day experienced a 20 percent lower risk compared with those in the lowest category of intake. Dairy intake was also related to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.

    The researchers did not have information on vitamin D intake, but the protective effect of dairy products could be partly due to their vitamin D content as well as calcium. The combination of vitamin D and calcium has been associated with a reduction in the risk of type 2 diabetes in previous research.

    Source: Am J Clin Nutr 89: 1059-1067, 2009.

    And the latest report implies that we have to stop taking calcium.
    Who do we trust?
    My suggestion is to learn more about supplements. Learn from the experts.

    What do we know about calcium?

    • It builds healthy bones
    • It helps our muscles to relax/contract
    • It is critical for normal nerve conduction
    • It helps with cell division
    • It helps with electrical conduction in the heart
    • It is essential for producing and activating enzymes and hormones that regulate digestion, energy and fat metabolism

    And because Calcium is a natural muscle relaxant it also helps you to handle stress and it’s one of the best used sleep aids around!

    What about Vitamin D?

    • It enhances calcium absorption in the small intestine
    • It enhances calcium utilisation in bone formation
    • It influences the utilisation of phosphorous – another mineral that is important for strong bones

    And magnesium?

    • It is an important component of strong healthy bones
    • It is involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates and amino acids
    • It plays an important role in neuromuscular contractions
    • It helps regulate the acid-alkaline balance in the body

    The synergy of calcium, vitamin D and magnesium form a trio that plays an important part in our health. I have been taking this combination for almost ten years, and I don’t plan on stopping. Become armed with knowledge and don’t let scary headlines frighten you!

    Further Reading
    Here is a rebuttal to the study from Natural News

    Is Calcium supplementation really bad Doctor Gerald Lewis gives his view on the recent paper with authors coming from Auckland New Zealand published in the British Medical Journal (29 July 2010)

    For women 40+ who want to live life to the full and stay younger longer

    If you would like to find out which nutritional supplements are recommended for healthy aging, please request my free eBook, by completing the form on your top right.

    I trust you found this helpful. If you did, please share it with others by clicking on the Facebook and/or Twitter icons below. And be sure to leave your comments and questions below. Thank you!

  • Jul 8

    News.com.au has reported that Gwyneth Paltrow : “has been diagnosed with osteopenia, an illness that can lead to the serious bone disease osteoporosis”. Osteoporosis is ”brittle bone disease” – where the bones begin to look like Swiss cheese. Gwyneth Paltrow is reportedly Vitamin D deficient. What happens is that the bones become so weak, that they break easily and then people fall, many times resulting with a broken hip. How do we prevent and care for osteoporosis?

    Doctor Ray Strand says “Osteoporosis is an epidemic nutritional deficiency in the United States. More than 25 million Americans suffer with this disease at the cost to the economy of the U.S. of approximately 14 billion dollars each year. At least 1.2 million fractures occur each year in the United States as a direct result of osteoporosis. Spontaneous compression fractures of the vertebrae of the back cause tremendous pain and suffering for those with osteoporosis.
    The American diet, with its high intake of white breads, white flour, refined sugars, and fat, has been shown to be deficient in many of the essential nutrients needed for healthy bones”.

    I remember as a young child, being fascinated by hunched-over old people “looking for coins on the ground” – I later understood that their spines had deteriorated due to osteoporosis.

    We can prevent osteoporosis, but we need to start in our teenage years by getting optimal amounts of calcium, magnesium and Vitamin D. Our bones are growing fast at that time and need the nutritional support to grow strong.

    At post-menopause we need to continue with adequate calcium in our diet, bearing in mind that we need sufficient magnesium and Vitamin D for the calcium to be utilised by our bodies, along with advanced-quality broad spectrum supplements (nutriceuticals) – antioxidants, multi-vitamins and multi-minerals. We also need to have adequate amounts of fresh fruit and vegetables. Exercise is crucial to the health of our bones – weight bearing exercises such as walking helps the lower legs but does little for the back and hips; upper body weight resistance exercises such as lifting weights over your head are critical. By taking care of ourselves we can prevent osteoporosis.

    Can osteoporosis be reversed without medications? Listen to this 74-year old woman’s experience.

    What can you do to reverse osteoporosis?

    Click here for a List of Alkaline Foods – The pH Balanced Diet.

    For comprehensive advice visit Better Bones.

    My nutritional doctor’s advice is:
    LIFESTYLE Walking, Vibration training, working with weights, and sunlight
    SUPPLEMENTS good multivitamin/mineral, calcium/magnesium combined with boron, silicon and manganese, Vitamin D3, Omega-3 fish oils

    I would suggest that if you have a blender/juicer that you make the Green Smoothie’s in the recipes you can download here, and drink one daily.

    Doing all that would provide you with the building blocks to getting healthy strong bones (and the other side-effects of a healthy body!!!)

    For women 40+ who want to live life to the full and stay younger longer

    If you would like to find out which nutritional supplements are recommended for bone health, please request my free eBook, by completing the form on your top right.

    I trust you found this helpful. If you did, please share it with others by clicking on the Facebook and/or Twitter icons below. And be sure to leave your comments and questions below. Thank you!

  • May 7

    How does sleep affect aging? Different people thrive on different amounts of sleep. Research shows that we get the best quality of sleep between the hours of 10pm and 2am. Why is it important to sleep early? Between the hours of 11pm and 1am, your body’s adrenals undergo recovery and recharging. Lack of good quality sleep will affect how we age.

    The consequences of insufficient sleep are:
    1. Viral infections
    2. Weight gain
    3. Diabetes Mellitus Type 2
    4. High blood pressure
    5. Heart disease
    6. Mental Illness
    7. Mortality

    What can you do if you cannot sleep?

    First of all, look at your lifestyle –
    * Do you get daily exercise?
    * Get your Vitamin D levels checked. Restless sleep may be caused by Vitamin D3 deficiency.
    * Are you taking prescription medicine that may be interfering with your sleep?
    * Hormonal issues? – going through menopause can cause sleep disturbance – find a doctor who will check your hormone levels and who prescribes ONLY Bioidentical Hormones. Buy the book ‘Breakthrough’ by Suzanne Somers (link below) and read chapter 22.
    * Do you abstain from drinking excessive alcohol? (best to avoid alcohol if insomnia is a problem)
    * Avoid caffeine (it’s a bladder irritant)
    * Do you meditate to empty your brain of thoughts?
    * Do you have your last meal/snack at least 4 hours before retiring?
    * Is your bedroom darkened?
    * Cover your bedroom mirrors if their reflections make you feel unsafe
    * Is your bedroom quiet?
    * Is your bed comfortable?
    * Develop and adhere to a ‘going to sleep’ ritual
    * Consider purchasing a magnetic bed system
    * Don’t watch, read or listen to anything that might be disturbing before bedtime which might activate your sympathetic nervous system
    *Avoid emotionally stressful discussions or potentially difficult phone calls near bedtime
    * Don’t stew over worries, things not said, things not done or what you have to do tomorrow
    * Put your worries to bed by writing them down so you don’t have to think about them

    Secondly, you may find it helpful to get out of bed and find a warm, comfortable place to read quietly for half an hour, have a small glass of water and then return to bed.

    Thirdly, you may wish to consider taking supplements such as melatonin and/or a high quality calcium/magnesium supplement.

    Calcium and magnesium helps with the expansion and contraction of muscles, with magnesium supporting the relaxation of muscles throughout our bodies. Women need extra calcium (daily intake 1200mg pre-menopause and 1500mg post-menopause), as we age. Calcium has a calming effect on the nervous system, helps promote restful and high quality sleep, and is good to take right at bedtime. Take calcium with magnesium and Vitamin D for best absorption. Magnesium has a calming effect on the brain and nervous system, and is important for good sleep. It’s a natural sedative and helps the body absorb calcium. A suggested daily magnesium intake is 300mg-500mg. Take your calcium/magnesium supplement along with good quality multivitamin/multimineral to promote the reduction of the effects of stress. Nutrition for good sleep is not instantaneous but may be helpful over time.

    We need to sleep in a darkened room so that our bodies can produce melatonin. Melatonin is useful in many important relationships in promoting sleep, mood, and sex drive, reducing depression and the rate of aging, and helping maintain freedom from cancer, diabetes, heart disease and chronic disease in general.

    Other natural sleep aids are Natural Progesterone, Kava Kava, Valerian and 5-HTP. These can lose their effectiveness over time so it’s best to use them sparingly, and only after you have tried other routes to a good night’s sleep.

    With thanks to Doctor Christiane Northrup “The Wisdom of Menopause” for additional points.

    Here is what Dr Mercola has to say about sleep:
    “Too little sleep impacts your levels of thyroid and stress hormones, which in turn can affect your memory and immune system, your heart and metabolism, and much more. Over time, lack of sleep can lead to:
    Weight gain
    Depression
    High blood sugar levels and an increased risk of diabetes
    Brain damage
    The consequences of sleep deprivation are so intense because your circadian rhythm has evolved over hundreds of generations to align your physiology with your environment, and your body clock assumes that, like your ancestors, you sleep at night and stay awake during daylight hours.

    If you confuse the situation by depriving yourself of enough hours of sleep, you send conflicting signals to your body. For instance, in addition to the above, too little sleep can:

    Increase your risk of cancer by altering the balance of hormones in your body
    Accelerate aging
    Increase your risk of heart disease and stroke
    Raise your blood pressure
    Speed up tumor growth. Tumors grow two to three times faster in laboratory animals with severe sleep dysfunctions
    Sleep researchers from across the United States have also discovered that:

    A single night of sleeping only four to six hours can impact your ability to think clearly the next day.
    Sleep deprivation can cause changes in your brain activity similar to those experienced by people with psychiatric disorders.
    Additionally, your body does most of its repairs during sleep, so not getting enough of it can impair your immune system, leaving you less able to fight off diseases of ALL kinds.”

    Find out which advanced quality nutritional products I use and recommend.

    Purchase The Harvard Medical School Guide to ‘A Good Night’s Sleep’

    Breakthrough by Suzanne Somers is a remarkable book with enlightening information from doctors who are at the forefront of antiaging medicine (for a healthy long life). This book may be a bit technical in places but you will become empowered with knowledge.

    For women 40+ who want to live life to the full and stay younger longer

    If you would like to find out which nutritional supplements are recommended for healthy aging, please request my free eBook, by completing the form on your top right.

    I trust you found this helpful. If you did, please share it with others by clicking on the Facebook and/or Twitter icons below. And be sure to leave your comments and questions below. Thank you!

  • Mar 22

    What anti-aging strategies do you have in place? I am a baby boomer and I am feeling great.  However I see other boomers who are starting to crumble.  Just recently a friend of mine, who is well under 50, has been diagnosed with pre-cancerous cells and will shortly be undergoing an operation.  Her youngest daughter is 6 years old.  Who do you know who has suffered from cancer, heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, and stroke?  I have had two friends my age die from breast cancer and ovarian cancer in the last two years.  What can we do to stay younger longer so that we can live life to the full?

    There are lots of commonsense things that we know about and can do (and should do).

    Here are 8 anti-aging strategies:
    1. Eat fresh non-processed food.  Eat a variety of fruit and veggies every day.  Cut out sugar. Eat good quality protein in small amounts.

    2. Drink plenty of good water.  Some people say they don’t like the taste.  I have installed a reverse osmosis water filter and it not only makes the water taste delicious,  chemicals and toxins have been removed. On top of flushing toxins out of the body, a major BENEFIT of drinking water is to carry NUTRIENTS into the cells of the body. In addition to helping nutrients get into the cells where they are needed, the benefit of drinking water in adequate amounts also helps to keep the CELLS well …hydrated so they can FUNCTION properly and efficiently.

    3. Exercise.  Find something you enjoy – walking, dancing, cycling, gardening, jogging…add a comment and tell us what you do for exercise (and keep it clean!)

    4. Rest.  Find something that gives you peaceful enjoyment that releases you from life’s stresses.  It may be meditation, listening to music, curling up with a good library book.  What do you do for quiet enjoyment?

    5.  Take advanced quality nutritional supplements. Taking once-a-day supplements will not make you healthier.  Nor do supplements that are at Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA/RDI) doses.  They are a waste of money.  The best ones are at optimum levels.  Everyone needs to at least take a mega antioxidant, a multi-mineral, a calcium/magnesium and omega-3 supplements.

    6. Check your attitude.  Do you look for solutions or do you focus on the problems?  Do you look for good in people or do you enjoy criticising?  Do you work at being positive or negative?  It’s your choice what you think – so choose wisely. This is a video of man who is making the most of what he has got.

    7.  Have fun!  Look after your friends and family. Make new friends.   Share, laugh and cry together.  Contribute to your community – giving is far more rewarding than receiving.

    8. Last but not least – visit your dentist. Yes, attractive looking teeth make us look younger and not only that, good oral health is vital for our health. This is a tip that is often overlooked. My journey over the last nine years has awakened me to the health benefits of good oral health. And on top of that, I am married to a dentist who has also been educating me about the toxic nature of mercury amalgam fillings. By going to your dentist regularly you will be helped to keep gum disease and tooth decay at bay. Bacteria in the mouth contributes to inflammation which may lead to heart disease and diabetes. If you have mercury amalgam fillings consider having them removed safely and replaced with natural white coloured fillings for younger looking teeth.

    For women 40+ who want to live life to the full and stay younger longer

    If you would like to find out which nutritional supplements are recommended for healthy aging, please request my free eBook, by completing the form on your top right.

    I trust you found this helpful. If you did, please share it with others by clicking on the Facebook and/or Twitter icons below. And be sure to leave your comments and questions below. Thank you!

Archives