Healthy Aging Resources

Live Life to the Full in Optimal Health

  • Jul 8

    News.com.au has reported that Gwyneth Paltrow : “has been diagnosed with osteopenia, an illness that can lead to the serious bone disease osteoporosis”. Osteoporosis is ”brittle bone disease” – where the bones begin to look like Swiss cheese. Gwyneth Paltrow is reportedly Vitamin D deficient. What happens is that the bones become so weak, that they break easily and then people fall, many times resulting with a broken hip. How do we prevent and care for osteoporosis?

    Doctor Ray Strand says “Osteoporosis is an epidemic nutritional deficiency in the United States. More than 25 million Americans suffer with this disease at the cost to the economy of the U.S. of approximately 14 billion dollars each year. At least 1.2 million fractures occur each year in the United States as a direct result of osteoporosis. Spontaneous compression fractures of the vertebrae of the back cause tremendous pain and suffering for those with osteoporosis.
    The American diet, with its high intake of white breads, white flour, refined sugars, and fat, has been shown to be deficient in many of the essential nutrients needed for healthy bones”.

    I remember as a young child, being fascinated by hunched-over old people “looking for coins on the ground” – I later understood that their spines had deteriorated due to osteoporosis.

    We can prevent osteoporosis, but we need to start in our teenage years by getting optimal amounts of calcium, magnesium and Vitamin D. Our bones are growing fast at that time and need the nutritional support to grow strong.

    At post-menopause we need to continue with adequate calcium in our diet, bearing in mind that we need sufficient magnesium and Vitamin D for the calcium to be utilised by our bodies, along with advanced-quality broad spectrum supplements (nutriceuticals) – antioxidants, multi-vitamins and multi-minerals. We also need to have adequate amounts of fresh fruit and vegetables. Exercise is crucial to the health of our bones – weight bearing exercises such as walking helps the lower legs but does little for the back and hips; upper body weight resistance exercises such as lifting weights over your head are critical. By taking care of ourselves we can prevent osteoporosis.

    Can osteoporosis be reversed without medications? Listen to this 74-year old woman’s experience.

    What can you do to reverse osteoporosis?

    Click here for a List of Alkaline Foods – The pH Balanced Diet.

    For comprehensive advice visit Better Bones.

    My nutritional doctor’s advice is:
    LIFESTYLE Walking, Vibration training, working with weights, and sunlight
    SUPPLEMENTS good multivitamin/mineral, calcium/magnesium combined with boron, silicon and manganese, Vitamin D3, Omega-3 fish oils

    I would suggest that if you have a blender/juicer that you make the Green Smoothie’s in the recipes you can download here, and drink one daily.

    Doing all that would provide you with the building blocks to getting healthy strong bones (and the other side-effects of a healthy body!!!)

    For women 40+ who want to live life to the full and stay younger longer

    If you would like to find out which nutritional supplements are recommended for bone health, please request my free eBook, by completing the form on your top right.

    I trust you found this helpful. If you did, please share it with others by clicking on the Facebook and/or Twitter icons below. And be sure to leave your comments and questions below. Thank you!

  • Jun 29

    About two years ago, a friend of mine who is in her 40’s came to me for advice about arthritis. Her doctor had told her that her neck was like a 65 year olds. Not only did she have arthritis in her neck, but in her feet as well. My friend is passionate about horse riding – how much longer will she be able to do that? How do we prevent and care for Arthritis?

    Both my parents had arthritis – my father’s was in his feet and hands, my mother’s in her back. My husband has arthritis in his knee – a result of a rugby injury and having cartilage removed. Arthritis is both painful and debilitating.

    What causes arthritis?
    There are two types of arthritis – osteoarthritis (the most common, caused by wear and tear) and rheumatoid arthritis (inflammation of the joints due to an autoimmune disease).

    Doctor Ray Strand says “Osteoarthritis is a degenerative process within the joints. Over 70% of the people over 50 years of age have some degree of degenerative arthritis. This is not a disease that will typically shorten one’s life, but will certainly cause significant pain and disability if left untreated.
    “When researchers study joint fluid extracted from an inflamed joint, they note a significant increase in the number of excessive free radicals. In contrast, fluid from a normal joint has no free radicals present. Studies have shown a significant increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis in those individuals who have low levels of Vitamin E, beta-carotene, and selenium. Research has further indicated low levels of vitamin D and Vitamin C in patients suffering severe joint disease and whose disease progresses much more rapidly than the norm”.

    My horse-riding friend is a ‘health nut’ – she eats organic food and has a healthy lifestyle. But that hasn’t been enough to prevent Osteoarthritis. My suggestion is to add advanced-quality broad spectrum supplements to a healthy lifestyle to support healthy joints and bones. And to also continue with exercise to maintain fitness, muscle strength, heart health, relieve pain and stiffness and to get better quality of sleep.

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease – caused by a virus or bacteria. The immune system becomes confused and it attacks itself rather than the bacteria or virus. The joints become inflamed causing chronic inflammation, pain and joint swelling; and the joint fluid which is usually thick becomes thin, so the cartilage becomes less protective.

    Further Reading
    (NaturalNews) A recent study from the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, Minnesota, has found that rheumatoid arthritis is on the increase among Caucasian women. And the culprit is likely an environmental one, like vitamin D deficiency, rather than a genetic one.

    Do Glucosamine Supplements Work? an article by ‘Nutrition Diva’ Monica Reinagel, M.S., L.D./N.

    Very informative article from the Linus Pauling Institute about Vitamin D and the health impact of not having enough of this critical vitamin in your body.

    If you would like to find out which nutritional supplements are recommended for joint health, please request my free eBook, by completing the form on your top right.

    I trust you found this helpful. If you did, please share it with others by clicking on the Facebook and/or Twitter icons below. And be sure to leave your comments and questions below. Thank you!

  • Apr 30

    What are the damaging effects of smoking? Smoking cigarettes ages skin faster than anything else apart from sun damage. There’s no gentle way of saying this. If you smoke cigarettes you need to stop. Aside from the many health issues associated with smoking – if you care at all about wrinkles and you want to look younger for longer – then smoking is out.

    Smoking restricts blood flow through the capillaries (tiny veins near the skins surface) preventing oxygen and nutrients getting to the skin smoking increases production of an enzyme which breaks down the supply of collagen to the skin’s structure. Collagen supply is vital to the skin’s elasticity. It decreases with age but smoking cigarettes accelerates this process. Vitamin C is required for healthy collagen prodcution and smoking destroys Vitamin C fast.

    Smoking reduces the body’s store of vitamin A which provides protection from skin damage smoking gets in the way of absorption of vitamin C – a vital antioxidant for skin protection and health smokers continual puckering from drawing on a cigarette and squinting in reaction to the cigarette smoke results in deeply wrinkled skin around the eyes and mouth – classic signs of ‘smoker’s face’.

    Acknowledgement: Julie Dennis Skin Care

    To combat aging for smokers I would recommend you take a broad-spectrum high-quality mega antioxidant and multi mineral, a high quality grapeseed extract and high quality omega-3. That way you would get the extra nutrition that your body is lacking as well as prevent further aging.

    Cigarette smoking in New Zealand is on the decrease. Slowly the message is getting through that it is one of the most toxic things we can put into our bodies. I don’t have any friends who smoke which is great, because I hate being around smokers as I am sensitive to the smoke – it stinks!

    I trust you found this helpful. If you did, please share it with others by clicking on the Facebook and/or Twitter icons below. And be sure to leave your comments and questions below. Thank you!

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