Healthy Aging Resources

Live Life to the Full in Optimal Health

  • Aug 27

    17 TIPS on How to Keep Your Skin Beautiful

    written by Bea Kinnear Your Skin & You 5th Edition.

    1. Your skin protects your body, but that’s not all. It’s the face you present to the world. When healthy, it’s a source of beauty. The choices you make every day — what you eat, where you go, how you feel — affect how your skin looks.

    2. Want good skin? Watch your diet. Higher intakes of vitamin C and a lower intake of fats and carbohydrates are associated with better appearance as your skin ages. Changing your diet will help your looks. Eat more fish, fruits, and vegetables to help protect against wrinkles and dryness in aging skin. To avoid breakouts, go for complex carbohydrates (like whole grains and pasta) and healthy protein. (Better still, remove all grains and sugars from your diet and be amazed by the results! Helen Wenley).

    3. Your anti-aging cream may contain vitamin C or E. Put these antioxidants to work from the inside, too. Eating foods rich in these vitamins, plus the mineral selenium, can help protect your skin against sun damage. They may even help reverse signs of aging, like wrinkles and skin discoloration. Taking high quality USANA vitamins should be the top of your list.

    4. Exercise benefits every part of your body — including your largest organ, the skin. Working out improves circulation, flushing toxins from your skin. Better blood flow also brings more oxygen and nutrients and may help your skin produce collagen, which staves off wrinkles. Don’t fret about sweat — exercise may actually help unclog pores. Wash your face right after a workout and avoid tight headbands, which can trap sweat and irritate skin.

    5. Burn the candle at both ends for a few nights, and you may see it reflected in your face: Effect dark circles under the eyes, pale skin, and puffy eyes. Getting 7-8 hours a night will keep your body and skin in top shape. It matters how you sleep, too — rest your face on the pillow in the same position for years, and you’ll get wrinkles where the skin is pressed against the pillow. Solution? Sleep on your back, if you can. (Although we realize you cannot control your body movements when sleeping)

    6. Stretch marks — 90% of pregnant women get them. They should fade after delivery. Weight gain can also cause them. Moisturizers might improve the appearance of stretch marks. Prescription Vitamin A creams or laser therapy can help. Acne is another common skin problem, caused by the extra hormones in your body. Your best bet for avoiding breakouts is to wash your face twice a day and use a mineral oil-free moisturizer. Ask your doctor before using any acne over the counter (OTC) products. (For acne: Again, remove all grains and sugars from your diet and be amazed by the results! Helen Wenley).

    7. Some women develop dark patches — melasma, or the “mask of pregnancy” — on their faces when they’re pregnant. An increase in melanin, the substance that gives skin its color, is responsible for these dark patches. Use makeup or concealer to help cover the dark spots. Melasma usually fades after delivery. Reduce pigment changes by wearing sunscreen at all times and avoiding the sun.

    8. Whether you were a sun worshipper in your teens or now catch some rays inadvertently while gardening, walking, or even driving, chances are your skin has sun damage. Some 90% of all skin damage is due to the sun. As your time in the sun goes up, so does your risk of skin cancer. Protect skin by always wearing sunscreen — even in winter. Hats and long sleeves help, too. Avoid the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when rays are strongest. (To be sure that you do not suffer Vitamin D deficiency, be sure to take a good quality vitamin D3 supplement. Helen Wenley)

    9. As you age, your skin changes. Your body doesn’t produce as much collagen, and the elastin that allows skin to spring back into place gets weaker. You don’t get rid of dead skin cells or produce new ones as fast. To boost aging skin, exfoliate to remove dead skin, use a non-drying soap, and moisturize often. Use an over-the-counter retinoid to reduce fine wrinkles or ask your doctor about a prescription version. Most of all, stay out of the sun.

    10. Caffeine in coffee and tea is dehydrating, so it may cause your skin to dry out. But a study found that when applied topically to skin, caffeine may help reverse sun damage and lower risk of some skin cancers — in mice, at least. Researchers are now trying to see if topical caffeine protects human skin, too.

    11. Too much alcohol is bad for your skin as well as your body. Alcohol is a diuretic; it causes the body to lose water. That can contribute to dry skin. It also dilates blood vessels. That’s why drinkers often have red, flushed faces — which makes rosacea worse. Over time, these blood vessels can become permanently damaged, so that skin stays red.

    12. Simply put, smoking is bad for your skin: It’s second only to the sun in causing wrinkles and dry skin. In fact, under a microscope you can see wrinkles in smokers as young as 20. Smoking reduces blood flow to the skin and contributes to the breakdown of collagen. Less collagen means more wrinkling. And yes, pursing your lips repeatedly encourages wrinkles, too. You can’t reverse the damage, but you can stop it by quitting smoking.

    13. Every day, your skin comes in contact with pollution — cigarette smoke, car exhaust, or smoggy air. Keep skin healthy by keeping it clean. Each night, exfoliate with a gentle AHA serum and toner to remove dead skin cells, cleanse with a gentle soap or wash, then apply a quality cream with moisturizers. (Oily skin still needs a moisturizer; look for mineral oil-free products.) Exfoliation might not be possible every night for those with dry/sensitive skin or sensitive skin, but exfoliation should still be done when possible to help the skin.

    14. Cold weather and wind bring on dry, flaky skin and can make eczema and rosacea worse. It’s not just the weather outside — dry heat indoors is harsh on skin, too. Fight back by using a humidifier at home, drinking lots of water, and applying moisturizer throughout the day. Remember the sunscreen when you go out.

    15. Want a tan? Get a safe one: use a bronzer or self-tanner. (But most don’t contain sunscreen, so they don’t offer any protection from the sun.) Remember to reapply sunscreen every two hours. And unless you have persistently dry skin, switch to an oil-free moisturizer to avoid breakouts in humid weather. It’s a good idea to rinse off after being in the pool to get rid of any chlorine on your skin.

    16. It doesn’t take long on a plane for skin to start feeling dry and tight, thanks to low humidity in the re-circulated air. Have a travel plan for your skin that includes drinking water — not coffee or alcohol — and moisturizing before, during, and after your flight. Don’t wear makeup on the flight if you can help it. Keep Intensive Hand Therapy lotion in a clear plastic zip-top bag with your other carry-on items.

    17. Hollywood lives by it: Changing the lighting can change the way you look. Fluorescent lighting can make skin tone appear more red or yellow, while incandescent lighting softens colors and imperfections. Use mirrors with varied lighting to view your skin and makeup under different conditions. That way you won’t look overdone or sallow as lighting changes. You can go more dramatic at night, when lighting is lower.

    For Beautiful skin, use the Beautiful Science of Sensé, because Sensé just makes sense!

    Have a Sensé-tional Day!
    Bea

    Your Skin and You by Bea Kinnear

  • May 18

    Our skin’s appearance can make us look younger or older than our real age. How do we prevent our skin from aging? And do we need natural ingredients in skincare to stay looking young?

    A baby’s skin takes 14 days to turnover or replace skin cells.
    20-30 year olds take up to 28 days to replace cells.
    Those of us over 40 can take up to 90 days to experience cell turnover.

    The struggling dermis needs more nutrition to help skin turnover, especially dry skin and all the problems of aging skin.  Over doing exfoliating will cause more harm than good, therefore, only exfoliate when required and dry skin requires it less since it is already in distress. Oily skin might require it more often. Knowing your skin is really key here, but over exfoliating is never the answer.  Nutrition from skincare and supplement products is really important for all skin but especially dry skin and aging skin.

    There are 6 causes of skin aging according to Bea Kinnear (Your Skin and You).

    1. Moisture – hydrated skin fights off toxic products and a toxic environment.
    2. Caffeine – as caffeine is a diuretic, it dehydrates our skin. To balance the drying effect, drink three glasses of pure water to one cup of coffee, tea or soft drink.
    3. Smoking – this also is a dehydrator but also reduces the necessary oxygen flow to the skin. Smoking reduces the body’s supply of Vitamin A and the absorption of Vitamin C, which are both vital to protect our skin.
    4. Sun exposure – ultraviolet radiation damages the many layers of our skin and promotes skin cancer and wrinkles. However we do need to either expose our skin very carefully to the sun so that it does not burn and/or take a vitamin D3 supplement, as vitamin D3 is an important factor in our body’s health.
    5. Soap – it can dehydrate the skin, affecting the PH factor.
    6. Skin care products – one of the major contributors to premature aging are products made with inferior and questionable ingredients. Barrier type products suffocate the skin and inhibit its ability to function properly.

    Natural ingredients in skincareThere is a big push in marketing skincare to make it ‘natural’ and ‘organic’. It up to us consumers to be aware that there are some ‘natural’ ingredients that are irritants to our skin and we do need to avoid them.

    Natural ingredients can be made up of known and unknown ingredients. The two types of natural ingredients are a) essential oils and b) botanical.

    Essential oils are also known as volatile oils and are from the plants that produce fragrances which may cause skin irritations. Some of the many essential oils to avoid are witch hazel, peppermint, jasmine, lavender extract and menthol.

    Botanical ingredients are from the part of the plant that offer a vitamin source. They provide good antioxidants to the skin.

    We also need to be aware of the types of preserving agents used in skincare. Many preservatives have the potential to cause allergic reactions on sensitive skin, and some preservatives do not support the product. Products that come in jars that require finger-dipping may become prone to bacteria.

    Two preservatives to avoid are formaldehyde-releasing preservatives and parabens. The most common names are: Diazolidinyl Urea, Quaternium-15, Imidazolidinyl Urea, DMDM Hydantoin, Methyldibromo glutaronitrile, butylparaben, Ethylparaben, Methylparaben, Propylparaben.

    All that might sound like a science lesson to you and you may be thinking that this is just too hard. It is reassuring that there are now products on the market that are self-preserving without any nasty chemicals and irritating essential oils. We just have to be on the look out for them.

    If you would like to find about the anti-aging skin care products that I use and recommend, please use the contact form on this site.

    And if you would like to learn more, you can download this document that helps you to understand why the technology of cosmetic scientists and nutrition experts need to have the same goals when developing a state-of-the-art skin care products.

    I also recommend Bea Kinnear’s book Your Skin and You

    Find out which self-preserving skincare products I use and recommend.

    I trust you found this helpful. If you did, please share it with others by clicking on the Facebook and/or Twitter icons below. And be sure to leave your comments and questions below. Thank you!

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